... Complementing Hypotheses 2a and 2b, we posit that societal institutional collectivism will be more negatively associated with the probability that individuals engage in self-employment on a full-time rather than a part-time basis. Part-time self-employment allows comparatively more time to be spent upon other activities, such as caring for the home and family (Burke et al., 2008;Thompson et al., 2009). This resonates with societal expectations to act according with the collec- tive's interest ( Bullough et al., 2017). ...

... In addition, flexibility is presented as a source of conflict that impedes growth ( Shelton 2006) that may even leads women not to pursue self-employment ( Greene et al. 2013). The quest for flexibility also means that women attach less value to business expansion ( Cliff 1998;Noseleit 2014), spend less time on their ventures ( Longstreth et al. 1987) and are pushed into working part-time from home ( Thompson et al. 2009). Although some studies contest the notion that the relationship between work and family must be a source of conflict ( Powell 2012, Özcan 2011;Marlow 1997), the implication persists that this is a "women's issue". ...

... For instance, some may resort to part-time rather than full-time self-employment to establish and run a social venture ( Austin et al., 2006;Korsgaard and Anderson, 2011). Others may favour this form of self-employment to jointly set up and operate a business with family members ( Baines and Wheelock, 1998;Fletcher, 2010), to work from home while caring for children and family (Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012) or to delay entry into full-time entrepreneurship (Folta et al., 2010). Although we recognised such arguments when portraying full-and part-time self-employment and developing our hypotheses, we leave it to future research to assess the relationship between societal culture and particular types of part-time entrepreneurship in more detail. ...
... In terms of industry, there appears to be some 2 concentration in business services (Soldressen et al. 1998; Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004), and several studies find home-based firms are started with low levels of initial capitalisation (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Thompson et al. 2009). Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). ...
The internet is the great equalizer. In business specifically, it has leveled the playing field. Anyone can start a money-making online business—anyone with a computer, that is. But here’s the thing: virtually no technical experience is needed. Today there are plenty of tools you can use to build an online business that makes the technical work a lot easier than it was in the past.
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